Income inequalities in the former Soviet Union and its republics

by Henryk Flakierski

Publisher: M.E. Sharpe in Armonk, N.Y

Written in English
Cover of: Income inequalities in the former Soviet Union and its republics | Henryk Flakierski
Published: Pages: 87 Downloads: 147
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Places:

  • Soviet Union,
  • Soviet Union.

Subjects:

  • Income distribution -- Soviet Union,
  • Income -- Soviet Union -- Regional disparities,
  • Wages -- Soviet Union -- Regional disparities,
  • Soviet Union -- Economic conditions -- 1985-1991 -- Regional disparities

Edition Notes

StatementHenryk Flakierski.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHC340.I5 F56 1992
The Physical Object
Pagination87 p. ;
Number of Pages87
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1732343M
ISBN 101563242206
LC Control Number92036986

The dissolution of the Soviet Union was the process of internal disintegration within the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), also referred to as the Soviet Union, which began in the second half of the s with growing unrest in the national republics and ended on 26 December , when the USSR itself was voted out of existence by the Supreme Soviet, following the Belavezha on: Soviet Union.   One way in which Moscow seeks to shore up its domestic political legitimacy and neutralize accusations of corruption is by spotlighting corrupt practices in the post-Soviet . Central European countries (fig. 1), its life expectancy (now 68 years) did not increase much, but did not fall like in other former Soviet republics in the s, its population increased from 20 mln. in to 30 mln. in , and its murder rate is low (3 per , of inhabitants, lower than in the US). In , during economic recession.   As with most of the former Soviet republics, life expectancy dipped slightly in the mid s but not as steeply as other former republics. Health spending as a .

  MOSCOW and KUALA LUMPUR, Jun 6 (IPS) - Wide-ranging economic reforms following the demise of the Soviet Union at the end of December mainly resulted in economic collapse in most successor states. By the mids, output had fallen by about half compared to Meanwhile, income inequalities rose sharply as real incomes declined dramatically for most, while .   Audiobook Changing Welfare in a Changing World? Income and Expenditure Inequalities in the Czech.   See document "Household Expenditure and Income Data for Transitional Economies (HEIDE): Data Cleaning and Rent Imputation - Appendix 1 of RAD project "Poverty and Targeting of Social Assistance in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union"".   Moscow/Kuala Lumpur: Wide-ranging economic reforms following the demise of the Soviet Union at the end of December mainly resulted in economic collapse in most successor states. By the mid.

Get this from a library! Transition economies: transformation, development, and society in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. [Aleksandr V Gevorkyan] -- This interdisciplinary study offers a comprehensive analysis of the transition economies of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. Providing full historical context and drawing on a. The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), was a federal sovereign state in northern Eurasia that existed from to Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics, its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow as its capital in its largest republic, the. Get this from a library! Explaining the increase in inequality during the transition. [Branko Milanović; World Bank. Development Research Group.] -- Since the beginning of transition to market economy, inequality has increased in all transition countries. The factors driving inequality up: increasing wage inequality (as workers move from a.   It’s really hard to measure non monetary benefits as people usually misunderstand Socialism. Let me give you some historical background. USSR was an advanced Socialist state, classless society and was using Socialist distribution model. In simple.

Income inequalities in the former Soviet Union and its republics by Henryk Flakierski Download PDF EPUB FB2

Pects of social inequality in the USSR before its demise as a union of fifteen republics. Recent cataclysmic events have only intensified the need for a systematic and comprehensive under standing of wage and income distribution patterns in the former USSR.

This brief monograph aims to shed some light on this neglected aspect of Soviet economic life. Income Inequalities in the Former Soviet Union and Its Republics book. Income Inequalities in the Former Soviet Union and Its Republics.

Up to this point we have dealt with different aspects of wages and wage differentials in the Soviet Union. Although wages are one of the indicators of differences in the standard of living, per capita Author: Henryk Flakierski.

This study analyses the newly available statistical evidence on income distribution in the former Soviet Union both by social group and by republic, and considers the significance of inequalities as a factor contributing to the demise of the Income inequalities in the former Soviet Union and its republics book by: Book Description.

This study analyses the newly available statistical evidence on income distribution in the former Soviet Union both by social group and by republic, and considers the significance of inequalities as a factor contributing to the demise of the Communist regime.

Income Inequalities in the Former Soviet Union and Its Republics. DOI link for Income Inequalities in the Former Soviet Union and Its Republics. Income Inequalities in the Former Soviet Union and Its Republics book.

Income Inequalities in the Former Soviet Union and Its Republics. Income Inequalities in the Former Soviet Union and Its Republics book. By Henryk Flakierski. Edition 1st Edition. First Published Only in the upper scale of the distribution do we observe visible increases in the inequality of pay in this period.

Analyzes the newly available statistical evidence on income distribution in the former Soviet Union both by social group and by republic, and considers the significance of inequalities as a factor Read more.

Income inequality under Soviet socialism. Journal of Economic Literature, 22(3), Matthews, M. Poverty in the Soviet Union: the life-styles of the underprivileged in recent years. Cambridge University Press. McAuley, A. The distribution of earnings and incomes in the Soviet Union.

Soviet Studies, 29(2), Author: Jose Luis Ricon. "Income inequality was extremely high in Tsarist Russia, then dropped to very low levels during the Soviet period, and finally rose back to very high levels after the fall of the Soviet Union". But there's more; several economists seem to agree that the USSR reduced income inequality (and increase social welfare) in other countries, even among its adversaries in the West.

The results suggest that, for income from official sources, (1) inequality in the Soviet Union as a whole declined throughout the s‐both before and after Gorbachev's accession inand (2) income inequality was greater in the poorer, southern republics of the U.S.S.R.

than in the by: distribution. The results suggest that, for income from official sources, (1) inequality in the Soviet Union as a whole declined throughout the s-both before and after Gorbachev's accession inand (2) income inequality was greater in the poorer, southern republics of the U.S.S.R.

than in the north. Get this from a library. Income inequalities in the former Soviet Union and its republics. [Henryk Flakierski]. Income inequality was similar if not higher.

Income inequality between Europe and its colonies was even higher than that above. I think it is grossly misleading to exclude the cheap labor and raw material sources from an analysis, particularly considering the Soviet Union was a large country that was relatively autarkic compared to Europe.

former Soviet republics is defined relative to the subsistence income or wage levels needed to purchase a minimum (defined in social or biological terms) basket of consumer goods.

Relative poverty is measured vis-à-vis some average living standard (generally % of median income or consumption), while subjective poverty.

Dramatic increases in mortality rates and a shortening of life expectancy were a truly unprecedented, unexpected, and still little-discussed phenomenon, leading to depopulation throughout the entire region of Eastern Europe (EE) and the former Soviet Union (FSU) during the transition to the market economy and democracy in the s.

Matthews, Mervyn. Privilege in the Soviet Union. London: George Allen & Unwin. McAuley, Alastair. “The Distribution of Earnings and Incomes in the Soviet Union.” Soviet Studies 29(2): Novokmet, Filip, Thomas Piketty, and Gabriel Zucman (NPZ).

“From Soviets to Oligarchs: Inequality and Property in Russia, Start studying Sociology. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Search. Income inequality _____ in the United States since.

decreased, then increased. how does the author classify most of the Soviet the nations that made up the former Soviet Union. Income, inequality, and poverty during the transition from planned to market economy / Branko Milanovic. — (World Bank regional and sectoral studies) Includes bibliographical references.

ISBN X 1. Income distribution—Europe, Eastern. Income distribution—Former Soviet repub-lics. Poverty—Europe, Eastern. The Evolution of Personal Wealth in the Former Soviet Union and Central and Eastern Europe* source of wealth inequality is the high income inequality due to wage decompression coupled with the low saving rates among the poor.

We pay a special attention to one of. At the top of the system of inequality in the former Soviet Union were the _____ apparatchiks, or high government officials. Karl Marx understood social stratification in high-income societies such as Great Britain and the United States as the product of capitalism.

true. Book Description. This interdisciplinary study offers a comprehensive analysis of the transition economies of Central and Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

Providing full historical context and drawing on a wide range of literature, this book explores the continuous economic and social transformation of the post-socialist world. ABSTRACT: Since countries in eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union have experienced a period of rising income inequality and structural change in health and social security systems.

Concerns have arisen that inequalities in health may have accompanied these reforms. In light of this, the main purpose of this report is to assessFile Size: KB. The economy of the Soviet Union was based on a system of state ownership of the means of production, collective farming, industrial manufacturing and centralized administrative Soviet economy was characterized by state control of investment, a dependence on natural resources, shortages, public ownership of industrial assets, macroeconomic stability, negligible unemployment, Currency: Soviet ruble (SUR).

Income inequality in the United States is the extent to which income is distributed in an uneven manner among the American population. It has fluctuated considerably since measurements began aroundmoving in an arc between peaks in the s and s, with a year period of relatively lower inequality between – The Republics of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics or Union Republics (Russian: Сою́зные Респу́блики, tr.

Soyúznye Respúbliki) were the ethnically based proto-states of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). For most of its history, the USSR was a highly centralized state; the decentralization reforms during the era of Perestroika ("Restructuring") and Category: Federated state.

Income Inequalities in the Former Soviet Union and This study analyses the newly available statistical evidence on income distribution in the former Soviet Union both by social group and by republic, and considers the significance of inequalities as a factor contributing to the demise of the Communist regime.

Author: Saltanat Liebert. China, North Korea, Vietnam, Cuba, and portions of the former Soviet Union third world nations the poorest countries, with little or no industrialization and the lowest standards of living, shortest life expectancies, and highest rates of mortality.

Environmental justice and sustainability in the former Soviet Union / edited by Julian Agyeman and Yelena Ogneva-Himmelberger. — (Urban and industrial environments). No, it’s the other way around. Soviet Union had a lot more equality in incomes.

Firstly, there were no private businesses, so eventually everybody worked for the Government, salaries were fixed and defined, there was no room for salary negotiation.

Note: The answer heavily depends on the year. I assume you are interested in s. Official Soviet statistics has said in that GDP was the highest in Estonia and the lowest in Tajikistan. (I have to lookup into economical geography books at. The income grab by Russia’s elite as the country morphed from a Soviet republic to an (increasingly autocratic) kleptocracy was much sharper, and quicker, than that accompanying the US’s Author: Gwynn Guilford.

The Soviet Union was a totalitarian police state - talking about such a society in terms of wealth inequality goes beyond foolishness. Stalin may be one of the very few modern humans who never touched nor required money for decades of his life, making him extremely poor by most measures.The Soviet Union, officially known as the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR or СССР in Russian), was a federal socialist state in Northern Eurasia that existed from toand was the largest country in the world.

Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics, in practice its government and economy were highly country was a one-party state, governed Capital and largest city: Moscow, 55°45′N 37°37′E / .